The Value of Alignment

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The teenagers are stretching their wings - testing their independence, growing their world and flexing their capacity to make choices.  The primary children are watching them and wondering why they’re being so weird and intent on changing the status quo, fully present in their current phase and age of being comfortable in their own skin and way of operating.  The young adults are busy stepping into their place in life - dreams are big and reality is an annoying interruption to the difference they want to make in the world. The parents are stretched, managing all the different ages and phases of their offspring with appropriate responses and expectations for where each sector is at, while still keeping a finger on their own dreams and hopes - in a much more realistic way than a dozen years before.

While on the surface, that might not seem like much of a business scenario, one only has to look at the amount of exasperated comments on LinkedIn around millennials or listen to business people talk around the frustrations of engaging staff and managing difficult employees to know that our personal lives have a lot of similarities with what we experience in business.

The irony here, of course, is that there is an oxymoronic tension between wanting the whole person fully present at work, while wanting them to leave personal baggage at home. In order to fully realise the potential your workforce offers, it is important to understand that people do come with their own worldviews, life filters, viewpoints, attitudes and yes, baggage.  It is the mixture of all of these factors that we call experience and it is this experience that holds the true treasure for business, if they can tap into it.

Three quick thoughts for you to tap into this potential.

Create a personal development plan for your team that includes their life experience, education, values set and goals on both a work and personal front.

Realise that your role in business is to remove the roadblocks that stop people being effective. This requires that we are clear on what success looks like, how they are tracking against our success criteria, what might be stopping them, and how we can remove all roadblocks and coach them.

Feedback is most successful when delivered quickly and without allowing personal emotions to get in the way.  One strategy for doing this is to realise that when people don’t perform to your expected standards, it is highly unlikely to be a direct intent towards yourself as an individual, but very likely to be a lack of clarity, understanding and/or being lazy and getting away with doing as little as you possibly can.

While these factors are very simple, what they actually create is a culture within an organisation and we when we focus on creating culture and give feedback from this perspective, realising the long term impact on the individual, their teammates and the business, we will find that we prioritise it as an action ourselves, and follow through on it.