Finding An All Star & Keeping Them Shining

Pic of team hands joining together to create a star

It has to be one of the saddest things of management and of business when a company spend tens of hours and thousands of dollars looking for, and finally finding the perfect person to fill a role and then fails to help them succeed.

I have heard countless stories where businesses have been rejoicing over having found the perfect person and this person is seen as the one who's going to make all the difference and they arrived to huge expectations of immediate performance. They are given the concrete boots, thrown in the deep end - and after a month people began questioning why they hired them. After two months there's the feeling that maybe they made a mistake and after the third month they're wondering why there are no good people to be employed.

Consider it from the employee's point of view. You find me find the job of your dreams and you arrive full of excitement energy and enthusiasm. Stories of induction disasters range from people not knowing you were coming; to arriving at your new place of work and being given several manuals to read through, so they can sign a sheet to say that you've read the health and safety and all other attended documents, before being told to start working, with little or no direction. This is a showcase for disaster and is the flip side of the above scenario - explaining why companies get frustrated that new stuff don't perform to their expectations.

Induction processes are often viewed as nothing more than a rubber stamp process and it is expected that this will be done as quickly and painlessly as possible, so the new person can start work straight away. The reality is that a thorough induction program should be run over three months to even a year. It takes three months before somebody has their head around their role and up to six months before they're performing well, with more complex roles only seeing a return after twelve months.

Here are some things to consider when you are inducting somebody new into your organisation

The clarity of role and the interview process is the actual starting point, where it must be clear to both the interviewee and the interviewer why this person is being employed and how they will help the organisation achieve their goals.

This first step should be reinforced, when ideally the managing director should make some time to welcome the person on board, share the vision and mission of the business along with why their role was created and how their role contributes towards the overall success of the business.

There are many aspects to consider when helping somebody settle into a new role and ideally a business will have a checklist to make sure these all happen (if you would like a checklist please do send us an email and we'll happily share our one with you).

Some of the top things I suggest businesses consider

  • to have a buddy system with somebody from the business comes alongside the new person and help them to understand the culture

  • having clear KPIs and KPAs with a feedback loop showing when somebody is performing and when they are missing the mark

  • an introduction to all team members and ideally a role rotation through the key roles that the employee will be engaging with to help give an appreciation of the work that precedes them and the work that goes after them

  • where appropriate, having any staff uniform, business cards, equipment and/or paperwork already sorted so they can arrive and feel immediately part of the team

There are so many factors to consider if you want somebody to join your team feel a part of it and feel connected to the vision you are striving to achieve. The sooner you get people connected and engaged and the quicker the speed of your feedback, the more likely you are to see success in your future hiring.

Here's to your success!